Mohler, Nichols, Sproul, and Thomas: Questions & Answers

A questions and answers session with Drs. Albert Mohler, Stephen Nichols, R.C. Sproul, and Derek Thomas.

Questions:

“No man knows the day or the hour concerning the second coming, not even the Son of man.” Does Jesus know now? (01:01)
What does it mean when we say that Christ had a “reasonable” soul? (06:01)
“Without the shedding of blood there is no forgiveness of sins.” Why does it take blood and not some other substance? (06:53)
Why was Jesus in the grave for only three days? (09:38)
Since the Reformers were fallible sinners, can we trust their view of sola Scriptura? (11:13)
Should church discipline be considered a mark of a true church? (20:31)
Was the Reformation part of the Renaissance and if so, how did it relate to the Enlightenment? (22:55)
When was the church born? (30:45)
Are we experiencing a new kind of reformation in the evangelical church worldwide? (32:18)
There is concern for the millennial generation not embracing biblical Christianity. What is the root cause of this and how should the church respond? (36:07)
What role does our holiness and personal sanctification have in our witness to this darkened world? (41:53)

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Stephen Nichols: An Apology for Apologetics

by Stephen Nichols (Ligonier.org)

My professor of apologetics in seminary told stories of odd reactions he received when he would tell people what he did for a living. The best story involved a bank loan officer. When he told the loan officer that he was a professor of apologetics, she replied, “That’s wonderful.” Then she added, “These days, we really do need to teach people how to say they are sorry.”

The loan officer was both right and wrong. We do need apologetics professors, but apologetics isn’t about saying we’re sorry. Rather, it’s about defending the faith. In fact, defending the faith is so urgent today that we need more than apologetics professors—we need all Christians to realize that they are apologists.

One of Dr. R.C. Sproul’s recent books is titled Everyone’s a Theologian. We could say equally that “everyone’s an apologist.” Those who are in Christ and have been brought to see the truth and beauty of the gospel have both the obligation and the privilege to defend it. We are compelled “to give an answer.” We can’t simply rely on the philosophically gifted or the culturally adept to carry the weight here. Everyone is an apologist.

The Command

The Greek word apologia means literally “to speak to.” Over time, it came to mean “to make a defense.” When Athens accused Socrates of being harmful to society, Socrates had to offer his defense. He titled it Apologia. He stood before the “men of Athens,” offering his reasoned defense. The New Testament uses the word seventeen times. Many instances concern court cases, such as the time Paul appeared before the Jewish Council in Acts 22 and before Festus in Acts 25. Paul also speaks of his imprisonment in Rome as an apologia of the gospel (Phil. 1:716).

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Beale, Morales, Nichols, Sproul, Sproul Jr. and Thomas: Questions and Answers

Gregory Beale, Michael Morales, Stephen Nichols, R.C. Sproul, R.C. Sproul Jr., and Derek Thomas answer questions ranging from Jesus’ baptism, the atonement, and church history, to their favorite books of the Bible, and the theology of N.T. Wright.

Questions:
Why was it necessary for Christ to be baptized? (1:17)
Derek Thomas, before you ran out of time in your message, what was going to be your third proof point for the resurrection? (3:19)

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Stephen Nichols: Those Who Are Called: The Effectual Work of the Holy Spirit

Salvation is the sovereign work of the triune God. His grace planned it all and accomplishes it all. Even more, through His grace, the Holy Spirit ensures that all the elect will come to Christ through faith and repentance. This session will explain the role of the Holy Spirit in effectual calling and regeneration.