R. C. Sproul: Question and Answer Session

Questions:

01:50 In Psalm 18, David said, “The Lord dealt with me according to my righteousness; according to the cleanness of my hands he rewarded me.” Was David there making the case for salvation by works?

02:30 I heard you take exception to the bumper sticker saying, “God says it, I believe it, that settles it.” Can you explain what is wrong with this?

02:54 What does God want most from us?

03:09 Are faith and belief the same thing?

03:35 Since God is omnipresent, does He manifest His presence in Hell or does He keep His presence from there?

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Mohler, Nichols, Sproul, and Thomas: Questions & Answers

A questions and answers session with Drs. Albert Mohler, Stephen Nichols, R.C. Sproul, and Derek Thomas.

Questions:

“No man knows the day or the hour concerning the second coming, not even the Son of man.” Does Jesus know now? (01:01)
What does it mean when we say that Christ had a “reasonable” soul? (06:01)
“Without the shedding of blood there is no forgiveness of sins.” Why does it take blood and not some other substance? (06:53)
Why was Jesus in the grave for only three days? (09:38)
Since the Reformers were fallible sinners, can we trust their view of sola Scriptura? (11:13)
Should church discipline be considered a mark of a true church? (20:31)
Was the Reformation part of the Renaissance and if so, how did it relate to the Enlightenment? (22:55)
When was the church born? (30:45)
Are we experiencing a new kind of reformation in the evangelical church worldwide? (32:18)
There is concern for the millennial generation not embracing biblical Christianity. What is the root cause of this and how should the church respond? (36:07)
What role does our holiness and personal sanctification have in our witness to this darkened world? (41:53)

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Conrad Mbewe: This World is a Sinking Ship

Sermon Text:
1. John 2:17 – The world is passing away, and also its lusts; but the one who does the will of God lives forever

Conrad gives us a heavenly perspective on how we should live in this world. Not giving in to temptations which are temporal, but contemplating on the things in heaven and how God so graciously showed mercy to us in the Gospel.

What are 40 years on this earth compared to an eternity with God?
Has money every sacrificed itself for us? Or any other thing?
Look to Christ, who died on our behalf.

John MacArthur: Discerning Judgement

Last time we discussed the necessity of discerning leadership in the church. But exercising discernment is not only the duty of pastors and elders. The same careful discernment Paul demanded of church leadership is also required of every Christian. The exhortation in 1 Thessalonians 5:21 to “examine everything carefully” is written to the entire church.

The Greek text is by no means complex. The word “carefully” has been added by the translators to make the sense clear. If we translate the phrase literally, we find it simply says, “Examine everything.” But the idea conveyed by our word carefully is included in the Greek word translated “examine,” dokimazō. This is a familiar word in the New Testament. Elsewhere it is translated “analyze,” “test,” or “prove.” It refers to the process of testing something to reveal its genuineness, such as in the testing of precious metals. Paul is urging believers to scrutinize everything they hear to determine if it is genuine, to distinguish between the true and the false, to separate the good from the evil. In other words, he wants them to examine everything critically. “Test everything,” he is saying. “Judge everything.”

But wait just a minute. What about Matthew 7:1: “Do not judge so that you will not be judged”? Typically someone will quote that verse and suggest that it rules out any kind of critical or analytical appraisal of what others believe. Was Jesus forbidding Christians from judging what is taught in His name?

Obviously not. The spiritual discernment Paul calls for is different from the judgmental attitude Jesus forbade. In Matthew chapter 7, Jesus went on to say:

In the way you judge, you will be judged; and by your standard of measure, it will be measured to you. Why do you look at the speck that is in your brother’s eye, but do not notice the log that is in your own eye? Or how can you say to your brother, “Let me take the speck out of your eye,” and behold, the log is in your own eye? You hypocrite, first take the log out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to take the speck out of your brother’s eye (Matthew 7:2–5).

Obviously, what Jesus condemned was the hypocritical judgment of those who held others to a higher standard than they themselves were willing to live by. He was certainly not suggesting that all judgment is forbidden. In fact, Jesus indicated that taking a speck out of your brother’s eye is the right thing to do—as long as you first get the log out of your own eye.

Elsewhere in Scripture we are forbidden to judge others’ motives or attitudes. We are not “able to judge the thoughts and intentions of the heart” (Hebrews 4:12). That is a divine prerogative. Only God can judge the heart, because only God can see it (1 Samuel 16:7). He alone knows the secrets of the heart (Psalm 44:21). He alone can weigh the motives (Proverbs 16:2). And He alone “will judge the secrets of men through Christ Jesus” (Romans 2:16). That is not our role. “Therefore do not go on passing judgment before the time, but wait until the Lord comes who will both bring to light the things hidden in the darkness and disclose the motives of men’s hearts” (1 Corinthians 4:5).

What Scripture forbids is hypocritical judging and judging others’ thoughts and motives. But other forms of judgment are explicitly commanded. Throughout Scripture the people of God are urged to judge between truth and error, right and wrong, good and evil. Jesus said, “Judge with righteous judgment” (John 7:24). Paul wrote to the Corinthian believers, “I speak as to wise men; you judge what I say” (1 Corinthians 10:15). Clearly, God requires us to be discriminating when it comes to matters of sound doctrine.

As we shall see next time, our discerning judgment is also an essential part of addressing sin within the church.

This Article: Discerning Judgement, originally appeared at Grace to You, Copyright 2014. All rights reserved.  Used by permission.

Horton, Jones, and Sproul: Questions & Answers

Michael Horton, Peter Jones, and R.C. Sproul answer questions about the church.

Video Outline:
00:0001:47 Can you explain the etymological origin of the term sixburgh
01:4706:52 I come from an Arminian background and have now to understand and embrace the doctrine of grace. This has caused hostility from my spouse. How do I handle this?
06:5211:07 Psalm 11:5 says God hates sinners. How can we reconcile that to John 3:16?
11:0718:47 I get confused at the mixed messages—one regarding the sovereignty of God and the other about man’s responsibility.
18:4724:07 What is the roll of the church to educate its members for the gnostic and paganism problem, especially equipping the younger generation?
24:0729:57 What is the movement against the organic church? Are they against institutionalized church? What is the difference between this and home church?
29:5736:03 If Jesus is 100% human and tempted in every way we were, does that mean he inherited a fallen nature from the fall?
36:0337:42 Christ is called the second Adam and his actions only affect those that believe, yet the first Adam’s actions affected all of humanity. Explain the difference.
37:4242:15 Could one of you explain covenant theology in its simplest form?
42:1543:43 Are there some books you can recommend on this subject?
43:4347:48 Is reading my Bible once or twice a week enough?
47:4854:18 Please explain the Manhattan Declaration and why John MacArthur, R.C. Sproul and others have not signed it?
54:1859:28 High school members that are here would like to know what to do if they have a pastor that falls under the definition of a Christless Christian.